Loading Events

« All Events

  • This event has passed.

James McMurtry • Dave Alvin • Jimmie Dale Gilmore

January 14 @ 7:30 pm

$34 - $47

Tickets cost $47, $39 and $34 (plus applicable service charges).  They are also available from the Lensic Box Office (505-988-1234). 

Tickets are currently on sale only to AMP members. Learn more about becoming a member.

Regular on-sale will be Monday, Nov. 21 at 10 AM.

Kick off the new year with three amazing singer-songwriters together on the Lensic stage.

Dave Alvin [web site | Amazon.com], Grammy Award-winning singer-songwriter and self-described “barroom guitarist,” is widely considered to be one of the pivotal founders of the current Americana music scene. A fourth generation Californian, Dave Alvin grew up in Downey, California as the local landscape quickly evolved from orange groves and dairy farms to tract homes and freeways.

Since forming the highly influential roots rock/R&B band The Blasters with his brother Phil in 1979, and throughout his long and critically acclaimed solo career, Dave Alvin has mixed his varied musical and literary influences into his own unique, updated version of traditional American music. Combining elements of blues, folk, R&B, rockabilly, Bakersfield country and garage rock and roll with lyrical inspiration from local writers and poets like Raymond Chandler, Gerald Locklin and Charles Bukowski, Alvin says that his songs are “just like California. A big, messy melting pot.”

Dave Alvin’s 30 years of recordings and live performances move through the loud, aggressive rock and roll of The Blasters to the contemplative acoustic storytelling of his solo albums and from the traditional folk of his Grammy-winning CD, Public Domain, to the electric blues of his Ashgrove CD. Alvin has always managed to unite seemingly disparate genres into a cohesive vision of contemporary roots music.

James McMurtry [web site | Amazon.com] spins stories with a poet’s pen and a painter’s precision. The acclaimed songwriter’s new Complicated Game, McMurtry’s first collection in six years, spotlights a craftsman in absolutely peak form as he turns from political toward personal (“These Things I’ve Come to Know,” “You Got to Me”). “The lyrical theme is mostly about relationships,” McMurtry says. “It’s also a little about the big old world verses the poor little farmer or fisherman. I never make a conscious decision about what to write about.”

Clearly, he’s only improving with time. “James McMurtry is one of my very few favorite songwriters on Earth and these days he’s working at the top of his game,” says Americana all-star Jason Isbell. “He has that rare gift of being able to make a listener laugh out loud at one line and choke up at the next. I don’t think anybody writes better lyrics.” “James writes like he’s lived a lifetime,” echoes iconic roots rocker John Mellencamp.

McMurtry’s critically lauded first album Too Long in the Wasteland (1989) was produced by John Mellencamp and marked the beginning of a series of acclaimed projects for Columbia and Sugar Hill Records. In 1996, McMurtry received a Grammy nomination for Long Form Music Video for “Where’d You Hide the Body.” Additionally, It Had to Happen (1997) received the American Indie Award for Best Americana Album.

McMurtry’s Just Us Kids (2008) earned his highest Billboard 200 chart position in nearly two decades and notched Americana Music Award nominations. Meanwhile, Childish Things (2005) scored endless critical praise and spent six full weeks topping the Americana Music Radio chart in 2005 and 2006. In 2006, Childish Things won the Americana Music Association’s Album of the Year and “We Can’t Make It Here” was named Song of the Year. In 2011, “We Can’t Make It Here” was cited among The Nation‘s “Best Protest Songs Ever.”

McMurtry tours year round and consistently throws down unparalleled powerhouse performances. The Washington Post notes: “Much attention is paid to James McMurtry’s lyrics and rightfully so: He creates a novel’s worth of emotion and experience in four minutes of blisteringly stark couplets. What gets overlooked, however, is that he’s an accomplished rock guitar player… serious stuff, imparted by a singularly serious band.”

Jimmie Dale Gilmore [web site | Amazon.com] is an easy guy to like. With his warm, warbling tenor voice and folksy, friendly approach to both his music and his audiences, his music is a rich blend of traditional country, folk, blues, and rock styles. His lyrics reflect both his philosophical interests and his inherent down-home nature. Since moving to Austin, TX, and reviving his career in the 1980s, Gilmore has in many ways come to represent the current Austin music scene—its rootsy mix of country, rock, and folk music.

Gilmore’s roots go back to Tulia, a small West Texas town where his father played lead guitar in a country band. When Gilmore was in grade school the family moved to Lubbock, a Panhandle town known for being the starting point for a surprising number of musicians (including Buddy Holly, Waylon Jennings, Terry Allen, and Gilmore’s onetime singing partners Butch Hancock and Joe Ely). Growing up in Lubbock, Gilmore met Hancock when they were both 12, and they remained friends and frequent musical collaborators ever since. Gilmore later met Allen, who he says inspired him to write his own songs. One of the first songs Gilmore wrote, in fact—when he was around 20—was “Treat Me Like a Saturday Night,” which is today one of his most enduring pieces. Later, another casual friend of Gilmore’s, Ely, turned him on to the music of Townes Van Zandt, which Gilmore says was a revelation for the way Van Zandt integrated the worlds of folk and country music.

Details

Date:
January 14
Time:
7:30 pm
Cost:
$34 - $47
Event Categories:
,
Website:
http://www.ampconcerts.org/event/262451/james-mcmurtry-dave-alvin-and-jimmie-dale-gilmore

Organizer

AMP Concerts
Website:
http://www.ampconcerts.org/

Venue

The Lensic
211 W. San Francisco Street
Santa Fe, 87505
+ Google Map
Website:
http://www.lensic.org/